• No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

  • Because the Delta is full of multi-generational family farms & businesses.
  • No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

  • Because this ecosystem cannot survive or thrive without fresh water.
  • No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

  • Because the Delta provides drinking water for two-thirds of Californians.
  • No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

  • Because the Delta is an amazing place to spend time on the water.
  • No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

  • Because the Delta is full of rich history & legacy towns.

No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

Because the Delta is full of multi-generational family farms & businesses.

No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

Because this ecosystem cannot survive or thrive without fresh water.

No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

Because the Delta provides drinking water for two-thirds of Californians.

No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

Because the Delta is an amazing place to spend time on the water.

No Tunnel. Save The Delta.

Because the Delta is full of rich history & legacy towns.

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ABOUT THE CALIFORNIA DELTA

The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta (Delta) is a biodiverse ecosystem that covers about 1,150 square miles and supports over 700 species of fish and wildlife. The Delta is an important source of water for the state, providing drinking water for two-thirds of Californians, and is used to convey water from Northern California to Southern California.

The Delta is home to over half a million people. It contributes to the state’s economy, with annual economic output exceeding $26 billion per year in 2008 (most recent data available). While urban areas such as Stockton drive much of the Delta economy, it is also an important agricultural region that produces a wide variety of crops, such as corn, tomatoes, wine grapes, pears and almonds. In addition, the Delta contains many small legacy communities that have historical value and the area was recently designated as a National Heritage Area. The Delta provides opportunities for recreation and tourism, including fishing, boating, wildlife watching, wine-tasting, and other activities and receives about 12 million visitors per year.

THE PROPOSED WATERFIX TUNNEL PROJECT & WATER GRAB

The Delta Stewardship Council (DSC), which was charged with developing and approving a Delta Plan to set objectives and the overall direction for state policy in the Delta for the next 50 years. BDCP (Bay Delta Conservation Plan) is the administration’s proposal, led by the California Natural Resources Agency and Department of Water Resources (DWR), to address some of the Delta’s water supply reliability and environmental problems. The main features of BDCP are (1) construction of two tunnels that would allow water to be diverted from a different part of the Delta and (2) restoration of about 150,000 acres of habitat in the Delta. BDCP can proceed without legislative action, although the Legislature may be asked to appropriate funding for some portions of it.

The centerpiece of BDCP is a new method of conveyance. Specifically, a set of tunnels underneath the Delta would take water from the Sacramento River to the existing pumping plants in the southern part of the Delta. The SWP and CVP would both receive water from these tunnels. 

Significant portions of BDCP can proceed without legislative action. Specifically, DWR can construct and fund new conveyance—such as the tunnels in BDCP—using its existing authority. The 1960 bond act that authorized the development of the SWP also allows for the construction of “Delta facilities,” which could include new conveyance. In addition, the revenues from water contractors that fund SWP are continuously appropriated to DWR, meaning that the department does not require an annual appropriation approved by the Legislature to spend the funds. As of August 2014, DWR had spent $202 million on BDCP since 2006–07. All of these funds have been spent for planning activities, such as developing legally required environmental documents, preliminary engineering and design, and planning the operations of the tunnels. These costs have been paid for by SWP and CVP water contractors south of the Delta pursuant to a series of agreements with DWR and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). Under these agreements, the costs are split evenly between the state and federal water contractors.
Statistics from The California Legislative Anaylst's Office, 2015 Report.

The estimated cost of the Delta tunnels project, Gov. Jerry Brown’s controversial plan to re-engineer the troubled hub of California’s water network, has jumped to nearly $20 billion when accounting for inflation. Tunnels backers say the higher cost reflects the impact from inflation over 16 years, not cost over-runs or design changes, and isn’t expected to hurt the project’s ability to move ahead. The latest $19.9 billion price tag represents a 22 percent increase from the estimate of $16.3 billion, released by state officials last year. That $16.3 billion figure was provided in 2017 dollars. It’s disclosed in a July 27 letter to the federal government from the recently-formed Delta Conveyance Finance Authority, an agency set up by the south-of-Delta water agencies that are attempting to finance the massive project. In the letter, the finance authority expresses interest in applying for a $1.6 billion water-infrastructure loan from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in order to jump-start the long-awaited project.
From "Delta Tunnels Cost Soars To Nearly $20 Billion When Accounting for Inflation" by Dale Kasler, August 16, 2018

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?

It means that California citizens don't get a say in this project.


It means that thousands of acres filled with heritage towns & century-old family farms will be subjected to 16 years of construction.


It means a suspension of the Clean Water Act and California Water Code.


It means that family farmland can be taken away with eminent domain.


It means that this precious resource will be diverted to Central California mega-farms.


It means that the tunnels project could compromise the entire Delta levee system.


It means that the tunnels project will cost approximately 20 billion dollars.


It means that salmon fisheries will sufffer.


It means that a California Congressman wants to ban future environmental lawsuits to do this deal.


It means that every student, resident, farmer and business owner in the Delta will be negatively impacted.


It means that an outside water district is selling Delta water back at a huge profit, millions of dollars.

 

It means that the drinking water of 25 million Californians (2/3 of the state) could be affected.


It means that the rights of California landowners are more vulnerable.


It means that water deliveries are overpromised--by more than three times the highest amount ever recorded.


It means our precious water will go to a water district already found guilty of fraud.


It means that there's no benefit of this project during times of drought.


It means that California's ability to produce clean energy can be impacted.

It means that native habitats will be destroyed or disrupted.


It means that there is not enough water in California to justify construction.

It means that outside water agencies and their big-money donors can decide the fate of California's most precious resource.

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